Mosquito ID

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The Mosquito Authority near you!

Mosquitoes can be some of the most difficult insects to correctly identify. Due to their small size and similar features, it can be almost impossible to tell one type of mosquito from another. Let’s get up close and personal with some of the most common mosquitoes here in the United States!


Black mosquito with striking white markings on the body and legs.

Very aggressive. Often bites during the day.

Vector for Chikungunya, West Nile virus and heartworm, among others.

Containers that hold water for seven days or more.

For more information on the Asian tiger mosquito, click HERE.


 

Small mosquitoes with a distinctive body pattern (shown above) and striped markings.

Very aggressive. Often bites during the day.

Can spread dengue fever, chikungunya and yellow fever, among other diseases.

Containers that hold water for seven days or more.

For more information on the yellow fever mosquito, click HERE.


Large, dark-brown mosquito with four dense patches of scales on each wing.

Most active at dusk and dawn.

Chief vector of malaria in the eastern, central and southern United States.

Permanent fresh water in sluggish streams, canals, ponds, and lakes containing surface-growing or emergent vegetation or floating debris.

For more information on the malaria mosquito, click HERE.


Light brown mosquitoes that lack distinctive markings on the proboscis and legs.

Most active at dusk and dawn.

Recognized as the primary vector of St. Louis encephalitis and West Nile virus in the eastern United States.

Containers that hold water for seven days or more. Storm drains and catch basins. Septic seepage and other foul water sources.

For more information on the house mosquito, click HERE.

Posted by in Education, The Threat is Real